30 Nov 2016

5 Delicious Ways To Improve Circulation

5 delicious ways to improve circulation on vickiarcher.com

 

Circulation, often a difficult one.

The older I am the more problem I have with circulation. 

Travelling is a given; it plays havoc with everything and the puffing and the swelling are the by-products of the adventure and excitement. It is that way and I accept it. 


I do believe we can help our circulation by exercising well and eating correctly. It is not a hardship to add these delicious foods into our daily lives, it is more about forming a good friendship with them and making them a habit. 


So far, ginger and I are firm friends; beetroot and I, mere acquaintances. I want us to get on better but we struggle together. I am working on it.


Watermelon? Yes, a big tick for watermelon and I need to try Ginko Biloba tea. 

And oily fish, garlic and cayenne pepper? Truthfully, I could do much better.


What are your aids to improve circulation? Do you have any tried and tested favourites? xv




5 Delicious Ways To Improve Circulation

  1. Ginger

Ginger can help to relax and smooth muscle cells which ultimately widen and dilate blood vessels. As a result, consumption of ginger can help to stimulate circulation as well as improve blood flow.

** hot water with a grating of ginger and a squeeze of fresh lemon to start the day.



Beetroot

Beetroot has shown to decrease blood pressure and increase blood flow.


Beetroot is a rich source of nitrates, which convert to nitric oxide within the body. This nitric oxide is responsible for relaxing and widening blood vessels.

** try fresh beetroot, a tiny crumble of goat cheese and a sprinkling of mint



Watermelon

The antioxidant called lycopene is responsible for watermelons dark red colour as well as its ability to increase blood flow. As lycopene is a fat-soluble antioxidant, it is best absorbed when combined with fat.

**Add watermelon to the morning smoothie with healthy fats such avocado, seeds or yoghurt.



Gingko Biloba Tea

Ginkgo Biloba is one of the oldest tree species today and has been used medicinally for thousands of years as an all-round circulation booster. This herb has been shown to improve memory by increasing blood flow to the brain as well as aiding the treatment of varicose veins.


This herb is extremely effective at increasing blood flow; therefore, it should not be combined with blood thinners. If you suffer from blood clotting disorders, are about to take surgery or undergo any dental procedures it’s best to limit the intake of Gingko Biloba.



Oily Fish, garlic and cayenne pepper

These super foods work in a similar way to inhibit platelet cells from clumping together, which can ultimately improve blood flow as well as lower blood pressure. Cayenne is especially effective at improving circulation to the peripheral areas of the body.

** Add a pinch of cayenne pepper meals.




5 delicious ways to improve circulation, lily soutter

Lily Soutter is a Nutritionist & Nutritional Therapist

Learn more about Lily @lilysoutternutrition.com



image, gretchen roehrs

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13 Comments

Taste of France

Funny–I just polished off a salad of beets, carrots, red peppers and red beans. Yummy!
It’s always important to eat enough fruits and vegetables, and to drink lots of water. But moving enough seem to me the best way to improve circulation.

Reply
Mimi Gregor

I always have greens (kale, swiss chard, beet tops, broccoli rabe) sauteed in olive oil, garlic, and red pepper flakes in a container in the fridge. I also have a container of roasted beets, cut into chunks. With these ingredients, I make a daily salad. I take a handful of the cold greens, several chunks of cold beets, add some crumbled goat cheese and walnut pieces. Then I make a fresh dressing for it: unprocessed, organic cider vinegar, olive oil, and a dab of dijon mustard. It’s a delicious way to get the veggies I need, and so easy to prepare.

Reply
Sharon E

Sounds delicious. Preparing it ahead of time increases the likelihood that it will be eaten and makes it easy to prepare.

Reply
Lisa DeNunzio

I unfortunately am not as disciplined as you Vicki. For me, the best I can do is drink lots and lots of water. Now that I have established that pattern I crave water. I do try and follow the Mediterranean diet….

Reply
Valerie

Follow the Whole 30 diet to reduce inflammation and consequently improve overall health which includes good circulation. Once you see and feel how your health improves with this new lifestyle, sticking with it is a breeze.

Reply
ROSALIND LAAIRD

I have become the biggest fan of beets, especially golden beets because they are not as messy as the red. I’m sure the red must have a few more antioxidants but I will forgo them for the convenience.
I roast them whole wrapped in foil and then peel when they are cool. I almost always have a stash in my fridge for salads with manchego cheese and marcona almonds. Yum!!!

Reply
Lidy@FrenchGardenHouse Antiques

Ginger and I are fast friends, beetroot not so much! I love Mimi’s suggestion of having something in the fridge, ready for salads..will try that. Sometimes during this busy season with the antique shop, my family and friends and all the hectic fun the holidays hold, I tend to forget about lunch all together, which usually means eating something way less good for me later on in the afternoon! guilty.

Reply
Mary

I happen to love sliced cucumber in Rice Wine Vinegar kept cold in the fridge for a quick slty, crunchy snack!!! Also, helps o keep the fluids moving out!!!

Reply
Josephine Chicatanyage

I generally use a cocktail of ginger, turmeric, ground black pepper (it works well with the tumeric) homey (raw if possible) and lemon. I have not been drinking it for a while due to other medication I have been taking but must get back to it. It should also have some cayenne pepper but I found this a bit too spicy.

Reply
Kim

Hello Vicki
I’m all for preventative healing, I take a lot of supplements that have been fine tuned – for me.
Meaning I’ve watched my particular symptoms over the years and whittled down to certain things that really help me. Changed my diet, and do my utmost to reduce stress. Favourites, lots of greens, lots of fish, water and coconut water and oil, for me less salt, mainly a veg diet, with eggs cooked in various ways. Supplement range : liver tonic, kidney tonic, Astragalus (immune mushroom), thyroplex, magnesium, Vital Greens – these give an extra boost that you cannot get from ordinary veg.

Reply
Patricia

These are great suggestions- I much prefer all natural methods of improving our health whenever possible – especially through food ! Just a tip about ginger – be careful if you happen to be on any type of blood thinner – ginger also has blood thinning properties, so it can be risky if you already take a prescription blood thinner…

Reply
Pamela

Thank you for this post, Vicki. Very helpful and interesting.

At this time of year in Oz I just go out to the veggie garden and pick fresh rocket and different lettuce leaves (reds and greens) and herbs to add to salads. In two or three weeks there’ll be fresh cucumbers, tomatoes, Hungarian peppers, courgettes and in a couple more, French beans. No pesticides or nasties – and super fresh, straight out of the garden!
So good to know beetroot is so good for us – I love it. Also watermelon – have it most mornings, along with papaya, mango, berries, lychees and a little banana (at this time of year) with Greek style yogurt. Not so keen on oily fish but husband insists we have tuna at least a couple of times a week. The baby limes have formed on our Tahitian lime tree in a pot and the lemon tree is flowering like mad and smelling heavenly.
Also a tip about turmeric. It’s not good for you if you have acid reflux (most of my relatives on father’s side do) as it can cause ulceration of the oesophagus/stomach. I guess in small quantities may be OK but I think if we’re talking about health benefits from it people probably mean significant amounts. Best wishes, Pamela

Reply

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