20 Jun 2017

5 Simple Beauty Rules

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Simple beauty rules seem to me to be what many Parisian women follow.

I know that I admire the way some Parisian women look and dress. Most of all I admire their natural appearance, their ability to look beautifully groomed but not overdone. The less is more is really so much more when you take note of Parisian women. We focus on their fashion and their wardrobes, which are elegant, stylish and classical. What about their skincare, hair and make-up routines?


Do they apply the same principles? I believe that they do.


5 Simple Beauty Rules

  1. 1. Exercise

We know that exercise is the key to looking good and feeling fabulous.

Parisian women exercise but not so much at the gym, they walk and they climb stairs. Their approach to exercise is more gentle but decidedly regular.

Mixing up the routine is paramount.



2. Eating

Eating the French way is easy; it is about moderation.

French women eat a little bit of a lot and they eat healthily. Less sugar is paramount. Good fats are in and packaged food is out.

The way to glowing skin is about what we consume as well as the products we apply.



3. Make-Up

The less is more approach.

The pale eyes and the red lip or the smoky eyes and a nude lip, never all together.

The red lipstick is a life saviour; French women of all ages have understood that for a very long time.

Face foundations are subtle and shading is a mere glow.

Eyes and lips are the only standouts.



4. Hair

Well cut and slightly messy.

That’s what I notice about the Parisian women’s hair, it is perfect in that non-perfect way.



5. Body

French women all over the country are firm believers in face and body treatments.

The theory is that if the base is the best it can be then the rest is easy.

I suspect that they don’t fret about what they can’t have but rather work on what they can.




Simple beauty rules to follow, full of common sense. How did you go with this checklist?

I needed a little Monday reminder; I am probably rating about 3/5 today. xv




image, isabelle huppert, attending the Jury Presentation Photocall at the Palais des Festivals during the 62nd International Cannes Film Festival on May 13, 2009 in Cannes, France.

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14 Comments

Pamela

You always look superb Vicki! And so chic!
I don’t fit the mould of the chic French woman – I don’t try. I’m Australian too, (though I do buy lots of French clothes/accessories in France) don’t wear much make-up, though usually different reds in lovely French lipsticks, my hair is usually a little messy – not perfect messy. I have my own style – and very surprisingly find that some French (often men – but some women too) actually compliment me for it. Perhaps because I do look different. I wear colour often, quite outre jewellery, always chunky artist designed Georg Jensen silver rings and one of their very special large bangles (a week ago a man swept off his hat and bowed from the waist, saying “Madame I salute your jewellery” – only in Paris! This would never happen in Oz!). The other day at the Foires des Antiquaires, I was astonished by the number of both French men and women who stopped me to compliment me on my style and jewellery. And I’m not young, a grandmother with pre-teen grand-girls, nor am I slim. So I think we all need to find our own style that works for us so that we feel happy and confident as we are and make the most of our lives. With best wishes, Pammie

Reply
Anita Rivera

Good morning, Vicki! LATE AGAIN, as we’ve been outside working on our gardens, and talk about a “beauty treatment”…being outside in the fresh air and of course, protecting my skin with a good hat, I’ve been getting a wonderful dose of happiness under the sunshine. Gardening does a body and mind good. I agree with every one of these treatments as well. Moderation as an American (and I speak for myself here) is not a concept that is practiced well. I have found that many people want IT ALL. So in order to have as much as we can, we go to extremes. Eating everything in large quantities only to need to go to the opposite extreme to take off the weight seems to have been a problem for decades. Signs of aging result in panic that for some, call for drastic measures. There is something to be said about moderation being TAUGHT from childhood and becoming part of the psyche so that it’s natural to go with the flow of life and allow simple beauties to become part of who you are.

I so love the French style of grooming, eating, living! It’s brilliant. Less make-up, more YOU. Moderation in tasting what life has to offer? Brilliant. Exercise as a regular routine and not just as a quick fix? Essential for a healthy existence. Thank you so much for these conversations, Vicki!

Reply
Mimi Gregor

Red lips — YES! But everything I read on beauty and “women of a certain age” says no more red lipstick. “They” say to go with a nude pink gloss. Urk! When I wear a nude lipstick (which I do if I’m truly going for a “no makeup makeup”, I feel washed out. But change nothing else and put on red lipstick, and suddenly I look more vibrant and alive. Perhaps because I don’t have lines around my lips, I can get away with it? Also, my lips haven’t “shrunk”, like I’ve heard happens in aging. Perhaps these things are preventable? I always use lip balm and wear sunscreen on a daily basis (even if I am not going out). In any case, I think one has to take what “experts” say with a grain of salt. But then, I’m a Questioner, and I always challenge the “experts”.

Reply
Vicki

I agree Mimi… I am no expert but I do consider myself an “observer” and I learn a lot more that way :)
Red is everything.. and MORE! I love nude too… but red changes how you feel. The trick is a good matte and an even better application..

Reply
Taste of France

I met the most amazing woman last week. I was admiring the new façade on a building and she stopped to see what I was looking at. We started talking, and she made a comment about her age. She was 84 but looked barely 70. Her hair was colored (reddish), she wore a pretty green top, pants and sandals with platform cork heels. I wouldn’t have dared walk in them. She was made up, just a little–mascara and lipstick. I asked her secret and she said, “Il faut lutter! Tous les jours!” (You have to fight, every day!) Just making an effort is the first step.

Reply
Bittie

I know about the subtle eyes with red lips, but the problem is always (for me) to find the right color red.

Reply
Bettie Pardee

You and I are definitely on the same wave length this morning…taking stock, reappraising, catching breath as I head into one of the busiest, most anticipated weeks of the year…all around the Newport Flower Show. Sitting here sipping my morning tea and reading your treasured thoughts and observations. Prepping for houseguests reminds me that I’m hoping our paths will cross this year. Ca va?

Reply
mona turner

Vicki, while you are observing Parisian women’s beauty, have you ever thought that other women are noticing your own beauty and may want to emulate that from you.
I truly feel that I have acquired the confidence to evolve into my own style from the inspiration and connection I feel from your blog. I never really thought how to describe the stlye I was attracted to until I came across your blog and I said, “I love all things French!”

Reply
Lidy@FrenchGardenHouse Antiques

Such a timely post, Vicki. Just this past weekend, as my family gathered for our annual garden party to celebrate my husband’s birthday, I reflected on the youthful beauty of my daughters, and how we, as women need small changes to that as we age. It starts with the right attitude, with exercise (which I’m bad at doing consistently!), healthy eating, and taking good care of oneself mentally right behind that. I have seen the most amazing older women lately, beautiful in their 80’s with a style that expresses their own personality so wonderfully well. Here’s to a week of embracing our age, and loving ourselves well!

Reply
candice

I love her .. I remember sitting in the theatre with my husband and wishing I looked as beautiful as she does, freckles and all. I have come to terms with my freckles but for some reason, they look so much better on her than on me :)

Reply
Vicki Ford

She is so beautiful, as is the amazing Jessica Chastain. Can you imagine – a movie with the both of them in it? I almost faint at the thought of that…That movie would be the movie to end all movies, I think!

Reply
Michelle

Love this post – I have become so comfortable in my own skin – I take very good care of my skin, exfoliating and moisturizing is the key. My husband said the nicest thing the other day after I probably complained about something or other on my face – he said don’t you notice that people look at you? No, I do not. He said as we walk through a store, etc. people take a second glance. How nice. I think it’s a real compliment when other women notice you!! I have found my style – good grooming, great posture and how we carry ourselves all make a big difference.

Reply
Georgina

Hi Vicki

Such an inspirational post – thank you.

The picture is just how l would love to portray myself. Undetstated elegance, age appropriate, serene – with you help I’ll get there, albeit slowly!

Loved this post

Reply

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