22 Nov 2017

Block Heel Meet Mary Jane

Block Heel Meet Mary Jane on vickiarcher.com


What a winning introduction – the block heel and the Mary Jane.

I reluctantly, very reluctantly admit, I have been struggling in my heels – BUT I am nowhere ready to give in. When I wear more than an 8cm combined with a pointy heel I am in trouble; I am talking serious foot discomfort. It has probably come from my massive sneaker and mule crushes over the last year. As much as I stay true to them, there are times when a heel is a heel and nothing can come between.


The reality hit at a recent black-tie affair where I limped for most of the evening – not elegant and far from gracious. I won’t even describe the hobble back to our car after the night was over. There and then I realized I needed remedial action.


As I am the shortest person by far in our family and as I do so love a heel I was not ready to retire my talons or give up a dressy night out.


So, I started trying the block heel and Mary Jane combination. Can I tell you this is a whole other heel histoire – an 8cm or less is like wearing a flat and anything higher is doable – not as comfortable but certainly in the realms of possibility? The block style does something magical to the feel of the heel and the ankle strap provides support. I am not a shoe designer or orthopaedic surgeon but the difference is amazing.


I’m wearing block heels on my best boots and also in my going out shoes. It’s a revelation but I’m scared to dismiss my stilettos. I did so love a thin high heel – think Sex and the City, Carrie and her blue Manolo’s – dream shoes.


On the quiet, I have fallen for comfort over fashion.

It’s a big statement from me; comfort is not my go-to when it comes to fashion. In this case, I believe we can have both and besides who wants to be the wobbling woman?


Not me. It’s not a fabulous look at all. Not one bit.



“You can never take too much care over the choice of your shoes. Too many women think that they are unimportant, but the real proof of an elegant woman is what is on her feet.”

Block heel, meet Mary Jane – you are perfect together. xv




When Block Heel And Mary Jane Get Together

korrie mary jane  ||  juveau mary jane  ||  reva mary jane   || nadia mary jane   ||   andrea mary jane  ||  nessa mary jane ||  velvet mary jane




image miu miu, quote christian dior

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18 Comments

Mimi Gregor

You will never look attractive if you are wincing in pain. I am short, but I never wear a heel higher than 2 inches. And they must be comfortable. A lot of what constitutes comfort in a higher heel is in how it is made in the first place. The heel MUST be positioned more toward the middle of the heel and NOT the back of the shoe — which is the hallmark of a cheaply made shoe. Also, comfortable padding inside the shoe. For my money, I’ve always found Ferragamos to be comfortable and fit me well. Looking taller, to me, is more about creating a sleek line with monochromatic dressing and vertical lines rather than walking around on stilts. And who says taller is better, anyway? There’s something to be said for having a lower center of gravity, particularly when imbibing over the holidays.

Reply
Vicki

I guess being shorter means it’s less far to fall if we party too much ;) ;) Ha Ha…
I have never walked around on stilts but even my tried and true thinner heels aren’t as comfortable as they once were… As for being short, I don’t care at all.. but it does look weird in our photographs sometimes!!

Reply
FrenchGardenHouse

The block heel Mary Jane is my new favorite too, Vicki. I just recently bought a pair of black brocade covered Mary Janes and they are elegant as well as comfortable. No more hobbling for me, either. I am looking forward to wearing them to the theatre and holiday parties this season.

Not only does what shoe you wear make or break you as “elegant” according to your quote, it affects how you walk, and as my chiropractor husband has told the girls in our family, it affects the health of your spine and therefore your whole body. How good you feel when older does relate to how you treat your feet when younger.

Reply
Vicki

They sound fab, Lidy… I do love this style… and yes, no more wincing for me!! Ha Ha… none too pretty!

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Linda B

I am a big fan of the block heel, for sure! In fact, this week, I have been totally loving my new Everlane boots with a 2″ block heel. As in, I have found an excuse to wear them almost every day! I have a pair of rather unusual Fluevog mary janes–a blocky curved heel, combined with a hidden platform, means they are not high-feeling though they look high. And I have other block heel styles. . . But I have mixed feelings about this particular trend of the block heeled mary janes; it is fine for every day, but doesn’t strike me as dressy. But it would suit me better than stilettos, for sure. I adore the look of those, but have hardly ever felt comfortable in them myself!

Reply
Wendy

I agree, no more stilettos! I can’t do it. Thankfully many of my favorites are available in a kitten heel. They are still attractive and very comfortable. I like a thinner heel for dress but I love a block heel for more casual ocassions.

Reply
Joanna

I gave up high heels about ten years ago. I now only wear 2” or lower and they must be a comfortable heel. I won’t torture myself in the name of beauty. It’s important to look like you are comfortable in your clothes to present a comfident, sexy and happy women regardless of age. There are some fashions best left to the young and perhaps high heels are one of them.

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Janice Quinn

Mary Jane’s are not a friend of us short girls. It is well-known that the strap shortens our legs. Block heels rule, but no straps please.

Reply
Vicki

I find the Mary Jane worn with a midi length dress or pant look great… of course, it will depend on the style of the shoe- … ankle straps though… I definitely agree.. they are tricky for shorter women.. :)

Reply
Vicki

I don’t know if it is a question of age or of common sense, Joanna… maybe we are just wiser and don’t put up with discomfort so happily ;)

Reply
anita rivera

LOVE THESE! I had a pair as such when I was 13. They styles are cycling and I love it. These provide a balance and a grounded feel while being stylish. Luckily, my dancer feet can still handle heels, but I’ve been finding some pretty gorgeous pumps at The Walking Company; I just got a pair of laced up black shoes that look like dance shoes. I can still work them heels, ya know….

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Lynne Savage

It perplexes me why someone would want to look taller? I love being tiny and at 70 never wear heels. Ballet flats look delightful with any outfit, are comfy and hopefully help save my feet for my old age.

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Lesley Hughes

My feet cause me grief. Probably not helped by stiletto wear in the younger days. If the feet are talking it is all over your face but block heal Mary Janes are something I just cannot do. There are better alternatives. Better choices and one big SMILE.

Reply
Ann

Vicki, these really are so attractive. I love the two-toned, double-strap version in the photos above. I’ll look for these during my holiday shopping. You find good stuff! :)

And Happy Thanksgiving to all the Americans out there.

Reply
staceydtrap

I am in total agreement with you on these charming shoes that remind me of my childhood in the 60’s. I have bought so many pairs of these maryjane pumps and am continually distressed by the fact that they push back on my toes causing great discomfort! Really, I can’t even wear a pair of pumps without being in serious, face wincing pain! I believe it is because the foot is lifted only slightly, pushing the foot forward into the toe box. A higher heel puts all the weight on the ball of the foot not the toes. I am still trying though and I order half size bigger than my already large 10.5 foot.
Always searching for a comfortable, fashionable shoe!!!

Reply

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