25 Jul 2018

Better Not Younger: The Age Of Movement

Better Not Younger: Movement Is Everything on vickiarcher.com


I had one of those moments this morning.
I was halfway through a training session, focused on improving my movement and flexibility when I “saw” myself from afar.

Do you know what I mean? 


That “out of body” moment when you look and wonder what on earth has happened. All those who-have-I-become questions and quizzical thoughts flood to the front of mind. I said to Louis, who has been working with me for some time, how my life revolved around “rules and sweat”. Not the prettiest description; training really does work up a “glow” and life has become more “rules ” focussed. Fewer carbs, watch the dairy, not too much caffeine and forget about excess sugar. Don’t fantasize about chocolate or if so, only the dark sort that makes my face contort like a wizened creature. I’d rather go without.


I liked myself as the girl who thought exercise was for other people. The girl who could eat and drink what she wanted, lounge about and never gain a pound – where has she gone? The one who could stay up all night, party hard and still string her words together the next day. She was fun. Now, she is the one working with the “rules” to age with grace and become a “better” version of her. It’s an admirable idea but I am sorry to farewell the old version.


Ageing well is exhausting.


It is a full-time job and in my case, the mind is very willing but the body is showing some pushback. Growing out the silver hair is easy and even adjusting skincare and make-up, no problem;  keeping the body lean and flexible  – there is the challenge. Exercise has never been my strong suit and perhaps I started far too late but I do know it has become the most important part of my day.


Rules?  What do I mean by that?


More likely guidelines are the way to say what I must avoid if I wish to stay healthy and wise. It is not me who is dictating the agenda, but my body. The reality is I feel so much better if I do stick to certain habits. It is as simple as that and when I don’t, I pay. Let’s not even get started on how foods affect the joints? Maybe we should – I would love to know what you avoid or add to your diet to keep your joints super healthy? Mine seem to become inflamed with the least amount of provocation.


Back to movement.

I am right bang in the “the age of movement”.

It is the answer and I must believe the pain will mean gain and allow me to continue to run at 100mph.

Full on is the only way I wish to be “better, not younger”. xv





 

The Age Of Movement

on sale means less pain and more gain

zella tank ||  ivy park leggings ||  ruched tee  ||  favourite hoodie

 
 
image, daniel de arco photography

VA In Your Inbox

subscribe for updates from vickiarcher.com

In This Post:

FEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATUREDFEATURED

34 Comments

anitapelayorivera

Good morning dearest Vicki!

Keeping active, moving at a consistent pace is my trick. I don’t run miles like I used to, and I don’t dance for hours as I used to. My husband and I however, keep walking every day, keeping our minds moving as well. Keep doing what you enjoy in order to keep that creative brilliance of yours YOUNG and your legacy alive!

Reply
Vicki

Walking is the best!
I want to try and get going a bit earlier and have a walk around my neighbourhood before the day starts… it’s on my to-do list! :)

Reply
Linda B

Vicki, like you I sometimes wonder where that young woman went to, who never had to worry about what she ate or drank! And the metabolism continues to slow down; it is worse at 60 than at even 58. (Actually, I should be saying 61, as my birthday is in just three weeks!)

I run or go cycling 6-7 days a week, at this point. It used to be 3-5 days/week. Some mornings it really is hard to get up and out early before work, or when it is very hot–which it has been this week. Highs temperatures are running around 110 F or higher, and lows are around 85 at dawn. Today, I decided to let myself just walk a few miles. That was lovely.

I have found that this movement, first thing in the day, is totally key to both my physical and mental/emotional well-being.

Reply
Vicki

Yes, movement is like a marker for the day isn’t it? I also find it improves my mood dramatically or at least energises me for other things…

Reply
Taste of France

I have always been terrible at sports–last in every race, never picked for the team. I used to say my best sport was reading. But I have worked out regularly since high school. Even up until a week before my kid was born, I rode the exercise bike for 45 minutes every day (I figured I needed to be in shape for something called “labor”). I can’t say I love it, but I do love the way it makes me feel. Which is strong.
I have a Fitbit, which gives me a reality check about how much I’ve really done and how hard I’ve worked. I have noticed that the days that I go running (I like high-intensity interval training, so jog/run/sprint in cycles) and then spend the rest of the day at the computer, I surpass my 10K steps but I don’t burn as many calories as Saturdays (walking around the market) or days when I putter around the garden–even though on those days I might not take as many steps and I certainly don’t strain my heart rate. It shows we are made to move. Unfortunately, my work involves sitting.
Another thing I love is Pilates, which feels like a mix of yoga, dance stretches, physical therapy and good old calesthenics. My teacher is very good about correcting our posture so we don’t get hurt. I have never had such amazing results from exercise. But it isn’t very cardio, so run I must.

Reply
FrenchGardenHouse

I am a slow learner to this new age of movement! I am not a fan of exercise, but needs must, as you say, Vicki, at our age. That girl who stayed up all night, I’m not sure where she went either. I DO know she loves herself a whole bunch more, and accepts her flaws…which in itself is a blessing, isn’t it?

As for the eating, yes, boring at times but so true. I’m with you on the dark chocolate…and do sneak in a milk chocolate once in a while. Keeping the mind active is most important I think – to create, learn and engage on a daily basis is a must.

Reply
LA CONTESSA

YEP……..did you see me agreeing with your EVERY WORD!??
Where did that GIRL GO…………..
Every DAY seems to be a SELF CARE DAY for me to get rid of some aliments.
So, we move forward ANYWAY!Gives us something to CHAT ABOUT!
XX

Reply
Mona

I try to walk every morning rain or shine and I have been introduced to eccentrics.com which is gentle and effective. I include this with my morning routine and it really feels great. Your joints will thank you!

Reply
Elizabeth

As we age taking care of ourselves through diet, weight training, running, walking, yoga and pilates is our new job!

Reply
Lynne

I have been a life long athlete of sorts–running and walking, tennis–whatever was available. As I have gotten older, I have a multitude of limitations imposed by Rheumatoid Arthritis and after undergoing open heart surgery at 53 for congenital heart deformities, found some limitations hard to break through BUT I really missed my sports so took up swimming and at just about every single day at 5:00 a.m. I am in the pool lapswimming–always at least a mile and more if I can find extra inspiration. I swear by swimming. Of all the sports I’ve ever done, a strong fast mile makes your old body sing and prepares your soul for the best day! I remind myself daily that these days are not a given and each needs to be well lived. Carpe Diem!

Reply
Vicki

It’s the one thing I have not got sorted out in London… the swimming… It is a wonderful exercise and I never feel as good as when I am regularly swimming laps.

Reply
Sunflower

Yoga Vicki is my love! I’ve dabbled with it throughout my younger life and have now come back to it these last couple of years. I’m definitely much more flexible and have don’t seem to have those odd niggles that appeared especially with one hip. I adore the calmness of yoga and that it’s a yoga practice and it’s not a competition. The meditation at the end of each session is wonderful, calming, relaxing and empowering and makes me feel so good when I leave the yoga session. Yoga is something I can do at home and on holiday and makes me feel much better than a run!!!

Reply
Vicki

I can see why! I am not practising as much as I would like but it is on my absolute “to-do” list – I know it makes all the difference.. :)

Reply
Dianne

I can feel exhausted just reading about all that you achieve Vicki. So admire you. Being an inveterate slob I have had to seek the easy way out and can highly recommend eating small proportions of food and incidental exercise. Always take the stairs, squat to do anything low, move more quickly, keep your legs straight when picking things up from the floor, make sure you move every 20 minutes, even if its just hurling yourself around on the spot. At 67 people still call me Miss. Okay so they are probably on drugs or blind but HEY it works!

Reply
Vicki

Whatever they are on… long may it last, Dianne ;) ;)
I exhaust myself and everyone around me.. ha ah… but I must like it like this, I can only presume.. :)

Reply
Jeanne

I was diagnosed with arthritis as a teen. The doctor’s advice was to move to Arizona where it is dry. That didn’t happen! For the occasional flareup I go on a strict diet for one month. No yeast, no condiments (ketchup, vinegar, mustard, mayo), only 2 fruits per day, no fried food only baked, all nuts are baked, no sugar, no dairy, no caffeine…pure simple food. It is a difficult adjustment for 10 days but at the end of the month my body feels wonderful. For the mind I am learning the cello. Never played a string instrument but it is fun…luckily I have the most patient teacher. Keeping the body AND mind fit is key.

Reply
Michelle à Détroit

I bicycle, either outdoors or on a staionary bike. I also do resistance training with both free weights and universal machines. I exercise 5-6 times a week. I don’t drive myself crazy with a grueling exercise regimen. I think that getting exercise should be centered around doing things that we enjoy and that we can stick with thoughout a lifetime. I have seen many people with personal trainers at my gym who grunt and groan, sweat buckets and never seem to lose an ounce. It’s not PC to say it, but I chalk a lot of it up to genetics. There is some scientific evidence to back this up. As for diet, I don’t impose any restrictions other than very low sugar consumption and portion control. My husband and I eat all of our meals.on salad size plates. Of course, optimum skin and hair care is also essential to aging well visually.

Reply
Vicki

It sounds like you have an excellent regime… and in most cases moderation is everything… Portion control… now that is a good topic… So true!

Reply
1010ParkPlace

When I was diagnosed with breast cancer 14 years ago, my two best girlfriends since we were 15 were petrified. As they told me, “You’re the poster girl for doing everything right, so if you got breast cancer, there’s no hope for the rest of us.” Unfortunately, now we’ve all been diagnosed with breast cancer… The third one last week, and it’s not good… As I age, I realize you can never stop listening to, and taking care of your body. It will tell you what it needs and when it’s sick. Don’t look at that as “rules,” but just as your operating manual. Brenda

Reply
Mary Levy

I did ballet for thirty years, but stopped after I threw my back out at 39. I’ve since discovered Pilates. That has helped keep the flareups to a minimum. I feel stronger than I’ve ever felt, but I miss my old body – the one where I could eat anything that I wanted and as much of it as I wanted. Now, I have to limit my portions, and I can’t eat as much bread or pasta as I’d like.

Reply
Dorothy

I discovered Taichi this year – I’m 60 – and it was definitely the right time and the right place. My body loves it, my balance has improved and my flexibity and it’s so calming.

Reply
็Issie

Hi Viki. Great post. I believe that movement make us strong and healthy, it’s like exercise. If we just stay still, inside and outside body must be weak. Exercise can help the metabolism works better. My mom is 62, she was lazy to move and wanted to stay still at first but I suggested her to do walking and do Yoga, since then she is stronger and less stress. When we are healthy, we will look younger automatically.

Reply
Ruth Benjamin-Thomas

5 years ago I took up ballet in my 40’s. It is hard but the perfect exercise for me. I now also do Pilates to help with ballet! I dance with mostly older women and we even compete (and win). I too have those days were I look in the mirror and say “what the hell happened?!” I excercise more now than I ever have.

Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

powered by chloédigital
Read previous post:
Getting Highbrow About The Brows

Close