23 Sep 2013

Monday Morning

Karl Lagerfeld

Big statement from Monsieur Lagerfeld.

It got me thinking all about ‘ink’… and wondering what you think…

 

I am going to come clean… I am with KL on this… It’s not my thing… but I don’t judge those who do.

I feel tattooing has gone a design too far… arms covered, legs covered, necks covered…

 

Some would say that’s my age talking… and it is.

I find most tattoos inelegant and badly executed…

 

Ageing with tattoos is something younger people haven’t considered… in most cases it won’t spell pretty.

But my main objection is to anything permanent… for if there is one thing I know about myself… it is that I change my ‘fashion’ mind constantly…

 

To ‘ink’ or not to ‘ink’… that is my question today…

Tell me… am I just way behind the times and far too old fashioned?

 

for more karlisms… the world according to karl

 

graphics via hot coffee with a straw

VA In Your Inbox

subscribe for updates from vickiarcher.com

133 Comments

Anita Rivera

(I totally agree with your Vicki)

I wonder what these young people will think when they look in the mirror 30 years from now. But like you said, one cannot judge the outer appearance, just like we wouldn’t think of judging anyone for the color of their skin, weight, lack of “good looks” and so on. But it does make you wonder about how a person covered in blatant messages in ink or with harsh images is going to feel about that choice later. Great thought for the day!It sure is nice to see you back. Anita

Reply
Vicki

I can appreciate the artistry… and I do acknowledge that a good tattoo is art but the problem is all the in betweens… And yes… the idea of an 80 year old wearing a ‘sleeve’ is somewhat frightening!

Reply
Jacqueline

I’m afraid that I don’t like tattoos at all Vicki ….. a piercing or two when you’re young isnt too bad as they can be taken out when you get fed up with them. What I think looks awful is a young girl wearing a beautiful dress that is totally ruined by a tattoo that shows .
….. and, I don’t think it’s anything to do with age ….. it’s not as if it’s a new thing ….. tattoos have been going for years and I’ve never liked them.
Each to their own of course but I have never had one and won’t be going to the tattoo parlour anytime soon !! XXXX

Reply
Vicki

Nor me Jackie… :)

It’s true tattoos have been around forever… but they now are more popular than ever in multiples… Having one tattoo seems to be no longer de rigeur… now it’s multiples.. and they are all works in progress… What about Cheryl Cole’s backside?? I’m sure you have seen that Jackie??

Reply
simone

I saw that photo of Ms Cole Vicki, I couldn’t believe my eyes, just awful…why would you do that to yourself, ugh.

I hate tattoos, big or small….what happens if & when you change your mind and yes, as your skin ages.

Interesting discussion :) Xx

Reply
Vicki

I am really enjoying everyone’s input… but I think, like all things… there are ways to do something and ways not to… CC is most likely a ‘not to’…

Reply
Jacqueline

I certainly have seen Cheryls tattoo Vicki { although, not in real life !! haha } and I think it must be the worst tattoo that I’ve ever seen….. how she can think that it looks nice is beyond my comprehension. Still, I’m sure she would have a few things to say about me is she saw me !!!! …… it’s good that we are all different. It’s what makes the world go round. XXXX

david terry

Oh, I’d say “don’t get me started, Vicki”, but?….since you already have?

Here in the USA, one of the most irrefutably “Trust me, Honey….you’re going to regret this someday” trends is for young-ish gay men to get enormous “maori” tattoos that sprawl across their hyper-gym-toned-&-protein-supplement-enlarged biceps and shoulders.

I suppose it’s preferable to going around with a perpetual chip on your shoulder (that might very well be my “look”), but this 53-year-old can’t help but wonder what’s going to happen when Young Mister Maori Gym Warrior stops going to the gym for four hours, four times per week and (eventually) becomes, well?…..a 53 year old who does’t obsess about muscle mass (at this stage of the game, I don’t do anything more vain than taking my metaprolol & amlodopine everyday to avoid a stroke, and doing my best to maintain the same waist-size I had when I turned 40)?

I can’t help but have visions of all these fellows, twenty or thirty years from now……scuttling around their rest-homes with “maori warrior” tattoos suspended from their shrunken arms and flapping in the wind while all the nursig-aids giggle.

Quite frankly?….my biological grandfather (divorced from my grandmother after nine months of marriage in 1939, but we did know him when I was growing up) was a former WW2 navy-man. He had some movie star (Betty Grable, supposedly) tattooed on what used to be a bicep. In his old age, he would show my brother and me the tattoo by stretching out his flappy-skin. This was never a particularly inspiring aesthetic experience, even when I was twelve and ought, Isuppose, to have been impressed.

Oddly enough, piercings (on men and women) don’t bother me at all….at least not more than the minimal degree to which I worry about some 20 year old girl who’s dyed her hair green to indicate her “independent & individualized spirit”. (1) you can always shave your head, and you’ll have a new head of hair within a few months & (2) it’s amusingly naive….why does that sort of young man or woman, when seeking to express his/her supposed “individuality” always reach for the most obvious cliche? ANSWER: Because they’re young and don’t know that both the “problem” and the “solution” are both cliches???

So…I always regret it when a young person (male or female) gets a tattoo. Artifice is for the middle-aged and elderly (and they don’t always need it).

This is probably the point at which I should admit that I have ten tattoos. I should emphasize that none of them were voluntarily administered, so to speak. I have two fairly obvious blue marks on the left side of my forehead…..those were adminstered by a girl in the fourth grade who knocked me down in a fight and began stabbing at me with a pencil. It was all very bloody, and, when everything healed up, I was left with my blue-tatoos (I’ll show you sometime, Vicki, if you haven’t previously noticed them).

The other eight (all of them black) are ranged across the area between my right index finger and that hand’s thumb. Those resulted (over the last 15 years) from my working with expensive, easily-damaged rapidograph pens filled with india ink. In each case, something happened to make me drop the pen, and I snatched to grab it before it hit the floor……and got the damned thing lodged in my hand. Talk about weird occupational hazards….

Sometimes, folks notice the hand “tattoos” and ask me about them, as though the marks were some sort of cryptic, Da Vinci code “clue” to my personality/history. I always mutter something about “initiation rites” and tell such folks that I’m not allowed to reveal the “Secret” of the tattoos….

Level best as Ever,
David Terry

Reply
Vicki

Your tattoos sound the most interesting of all David!

Those images of the ageing beauty are the very reason I don’t like them… and I can imagine those arms flapping about too!

Reply
Jeni

Oh David, I have a Rotring pen tattoo, for much the same reason as you, dropping my pen and catching it. The ink has worked its way into my thumb for about a quarter inch.

I worked with an older woman when I was only eighteen and she showed me her tats and they were hanging off upper arms that were saggy and baggy and the tats looked oh so ugly. In the hot weather she had to wear sleeves in order to hide the mess on her arms.

So, I’m not for tats in any way, okay if some young one gets them but in my opinion it is self abuse, a bit like self harm, except mostly administered by someone else.

Jeni

Reply
david terry

It’s amusing, Jeni…..only after posting that comment did I recall the trouble my brother and I (at about age ten) got into when it was somehow discovered that we referred to my grandmother’s wildly-flapping, upper-arm skin as “under-arm Dingle-Dangle”. My brother called her “The Pterodactyl” (ever seen a picture of one of those flying-dinosaurs???). My grandmother, at age 70-something, did have an ill-advised (in terms of aesthetic appeal, if not of comfort during long, hot Tennessee summers)penchant for sleeveless sundresses. She’d also spent most of her life being remarkably obese, but had lost tons (almost literally so) of weight in her late sixties.

We got in big trouble when the “Pterodactyl” business came to light. One of history’s most amusing commands (and, yes, I still recall my mother’s shouting this at us) was “You do NOT call your grandmother a big, flying lizard! People don’t DO that!!! Your grandmother LOVES you!!!…now, you march right back in there, and you tell your grandmother that you love HER…!!!!”

Sentimentally as ever (which is to say, “not much”…)
David Terry

Reply
linda pederson

I totally hate tattoo’s-You put it perfectly-“in-elegant” -Everyone is trying to be so “individual” and they are just following the crowd…
It is hard not to judge sometimes-I mean you look at them and say…What were you thinking!!!!!

Reply
Vicki

I imagine there is a lot of ‘what was I thinking’ for those who have a drunken evening and end up with a tattoo… but I think many of the young today are really into it and really identify with the ink and see it as art… Perhaps it’s just another way of thinking , but I am not at all sure…

Reply
Rita

I laughed out loud – such a vivid statement from KL and, yes, I have to agree. My daughters and SILs would disagree. :)

Reply
Brenda

I’m with you, it’s not for me but I don’t judge anyone who does. I feel it’s tacky to show them at work… a pretty dress, pretty shoes and a bird on your leg.
I do, however, like them on men. My husband has my name on his arm =)
Wishing you a beautiful week! xoxo, B

Reply
Vicki

I think the idea is to have them so that if and when needed they can be covered… at least if you want to dress more classically, for whatever reason… you can…

Reply
Carol

True for me too! Perhaps that is why we enjoy fashion and decorating, they are constantly changing. Often our tastes improves with maturity.

Reply
Vicki

There is no doubt it’s super painful… mind you I think we women can accept a little pain for beauty… ;)

Reply
Vicki

I did once… it was a beautiful Japanese ‘painting on a boy’s arm… I actually did that awful old lady thing of saying… I don’t like tattoos but yours is incredible work! He explained it to me and told me about the artist… and it was fascinating… but… my original fears still remain…

Reply
Eileen

I totally agree. God gave us a beautiful canvas. Why throw litter on it? Permanently! If I had a penny for what I bet each of the regrets people have had, I’d be a billionare.

Reply
emily @ TownAndCountryShuffle.com

I’m with you on this one. Don’t like tattoos at all. I recently saw an older lady dressed in a conservative twin sweater set and pearls…but full of tattoos. You could tell she had changed her life, but could not “change her skin”… I’m not an expert but I think they have “erasable” ink now as another option, but I still would not do it…

Have a great week Vicki,
Emily @ Town And Country Shuffle

Reply
Vicki

Perhaps she liked the reminder of who she was… but if they had been erasable she could have had both lives… and no conflict!

Reply
Leigh

I don’t think this is a matter of age. Tattoos are just not classy period. I abhor them. Unless you are Adam Levine, then it’s ok ;-)

Reply
Katherine

Ink isn’t for me. I’m busy trying to keep lines, dark spots and uneven complexion in control. -I don’t want to add anything to my skin, I want to diminish.

Reply
Vicki

Yes I agree… Why not play with the temporaries and enjoy those… they look good and last… maybe that’s a great business idea… sophisticated fakes!

Reply
une femme

I’m with you, the permanence of them scares me off. But I have seen some really amazing “body art” from time to time, and can’t help but admire really well done tattoo work.

Reply
Madame Là-Bas

I would never get a tattoo but I have come to acknowledge that for some people it is a form of wearable art. My daughter has some lovely tattoos that have meaning to her. Fortunately, they are mostly covered by clothing. I do believe that it might be my age.

Reply
24/7 in France

I too am not a fan of tattoos, and from what I understand, they are painful to have removed. I just don’t see the appeal of doing something permanent to your body that may end up being something you don’t want or don’t like anymore – I agree it’s not an elegant look.

Reply
Flora Fascinata

I don’t mind a good arm sleeve on a young thing, but I do agree with Karl to a degree. But, for years have been tormented with the thought of getting a white camellia with black ribbon on my ankle. I know. Still haven’t done it. Too chicken. Someone told me white ink really hurts! :O!

Reply
Marina Vadla

The only permanent thing in life is CHANGE!So why make something like ink permanent?
You are not behind the times or old fashioned, you are just talking common sense :)

Reply
Veronica Roth

I don’t hate them, and to each their own, but as an artist, I can’t imagine living with one, or even ten, or even twenty permanent images. I just can ever decide on something that would satisfy, something that would be that permanent and still be me. With this point of view I must boast a little: my children, aged 21, 31 and 33, don’t have tattoos either. They are pretty much the one ones of their contemporaries who don’t have tattoos. I secretly hope this doesn’t change. :)

Reply
karen in ct

… some look cute, for that moment … but the “always with you” thing is freaky …

Karen in CT

Reply
Lynn

So this is whatI always say to my children…”have you ever seen a bumper sticker on a Ferrari?”

Reply
Michele Gavaletz

My son is a tattoo artist and a great one – he does beautiful work; but like you, Vicki, I am not a fan! I wouldn’t even get one but that is my choice and I don’t judge those who do (or at least I try not to). I wish his art was on canvas and not on skin! I do believe a little goes a long way – too many is too much.

Reply
Vicki

We need his point of view here Michelle… I am sure he sees so many people from all walks of life… and would know exactly why people choose to have them…

Reply
Pam@over50feeling40

I will show my age as well and say I think most tattoos are regretted later in life. I also think it prevents some really intelligent young people from getting hired for top professions. I know young people hate to be “judged” on appearances but the fact of the matter is when job hunting, first impressions are crucial. I have seen way too many young people proudly displaying their body art in the workplace or as they go off for interviews. There are so many better ways to make an individual statement!!

Reply
Vicki

I agree Pam, if you have them they should be covered for a job interview… unless of course it is for an apprentice tattooist… ;)

Reply
Vicki

I am so with you on this Veronica… and I agree to each their own… but I figure we can have a point of view to… ;)

Reply
Charlene

I’m with you and Karl on this issue. It’s just too permanent and heaven knows what they’ll look like with age. Besides the flab factor, they often fade and have to be redone to keep the lines sharp. I know a young woman (still in her 20’s) who regretted a large one she had on her back and was having it removed. She said the pain was excruciating. I just don’t understand the appeal although I know many people love the art aspect. As for me, I’d prefer a lovely painting on the wall rather than a design on my body. : )

Reply
sneaux

I have tattoos, and I wouldn’t change that for a minute. I don’t take getting inked “lightly”. It’s only after much consideration, and finding a design that speaks to who I am as a person, that I get it done permanently. There are people who get tattooed just to get tattooed. I’ll admit that I’ve seen some really stupid stuff and have to wonder what on earth that person was thinking. The tattoos I have have been on my body for a long time, and I never look at them with regret. I’ll be 41 on Wednesday, and I wouldn’t have my body any other way. Granted, I’m not covered head to toe, and they’re all placed so they can be covered when needed (I work as a professional executive), but I never wished I hadn’t gotten them done. Each one defines a particular time of my life. It’s a memory book that walks with me everywhere I go.

Reply
Vicki

Thank you for contributing to this conversation and I am so happy to hear that you enjoy them and that they are part of who you are… I think taking time and considering what you have is why you are still happy to wear them proudly now…

Reply
La Contessa

I CONQUER with You and the rest of the people above!I just doNOT get why?I too think of the age thing and how awful it will look!I also, feel some kind of cancer will develop from all this ink on your body!My BOYS knew how I felt and I thought I had made it through this fad when my oldest sat down on the sofa the first of summer in shorts and there on his thigh was a TATTOO!!!!I am devastated and terribly disappointed in him………..he is 25 soon to be 26.As I said earlier I thought we had passed this FAD.I suppose it could be worse on an arm, neck,chest so this is how I console myself……….it will never show unless the SPEEDO comes into fashion and he has the good fortune to take a vacation!
As A MOTHER who wants to protect and preserve this has been very hard for me!I think KARL has made a WONDERFUL STATEMENT!Maybe now the fashionistas will listen!!!!!!!!!!I hope you found that quote in a fashion magazine!LOVE KARL and his collars!
XXX

Reply
Vicki

Good oon KArl… he is a stylish man through and through…
Dont be too upset with your son… it’s a thing of their generation… and there is not much we can do, but love them unconditionally… although i do hear you, Elizabeth… :)

Reply
Peggy Braswell

I am with you Vicki on the tattoos, I can think of many other ways to spend my money. I change my mind way too much to have a permanent any thing.I have heard the black ink turns purple after a while. Older tattoos YUK! xxpeggybraswelldesign.com

Reply
Vicki

Yes it does… and I’m not sure if they can be topped up or not… Faded ink is not so great… I believe the colour is one of the hardest skills to acquire for a tattoo artist…

Reply
lisa thomson

I agree with you and Karl, Vicki. No tattoos. In fact I recently wrote an essay titled “My Daughter is Inked; Does That Make Me a Bad Mother?” It is unpublished thus far but I’m hoping to get it in a woman’s magazine as I think many women my age can relate to my story. The permanence of the whole thing is kind of scary. But I have come to terms with the fact that it is my daughter’s form of self expression.

Reply
Vicki

Well done for being supportive and understanding… and you are so right… it’s her way of saying who she is… and if that’s her choice … then that’s her choice…The hardest part of being a mother is standing aide and watching them do what we fear they will regret… both big and small…

Reply
Vani naidoo

Tattoos? Can’t decide today as I ‘m in a place I have been dreaming of seeing- so far from my home in Hobart! Yes I am in your neck of the woods, Vicki! Loving the history,the beauty,the weather. Had dinner under the starry starry skies last night. Exploring from here for the next 4 days. Xx

Reply
Penelope

Lots of people have opinions! My son is a beautiful man and has a few. The most meaningful one is for a friend he lost and another for his four sisters. His wife has a couple. She is beautiful….I could just stare at her. She will only grow more beautiful….ink or no ink. The are educated and have great jobs. Plus when I am with them, I feel young too! Life is okay with ink. To me, it’ is heart where true beauty begins!

Reply
Suzanne de Cornelia

I don’t find them attractive, but assume I just don’t ‘get’ what ‘body art’ means. In the scheme of things…if it doesn’t hurt anyone else…I guess…que sera, sera and all of that ;)

This is yet another reason to miss my mother. “What do you think, Mom?” She always dazzled me at her ability to go right to the essence of any subject with a short quip.

Reply
Vicki

Yes… it’s true… When we reflect on all the disasters around us… what does it matter whether someone is in to body art or not…

Reply
Ana

What a great discussion Vicki…just finished ‘listening’ to everyone’s responses. First off, I’m also of the majority here ~ just not fond of tattoos and I’m trying to understand: why?

However, I do appreciate the workmanship & artistic talent of the tattoo artist.

The timing of this coincides with an article I just read this w/e…it was obviously in jest, but the article read that since tattoos have become so ‘main stream’ today, biker gangs are considering having their tattoos removed!

I sometimes also think, as someone in their late 40s, that my opinion may simply reflect my age and growing up back in the late 70s & early 80s.

I recall a particular episode on Nip/Tuck (as an aside: great story lines if you peel back the gloss of the show) dealing with this topic…A gang member wanted his tattoos of tears removed from under his eye (sign of killing someone, each tear representing a life & being initiated into the gang). He wished it removed because it did not reflect who he was anymore & wanted to turn his life around. But in removing the tattoos, it did not change anything for him. The gang members would not let him forget which he could never escape from. And what instigated it in the first place was that he couldn’t find a job without being ‘judged’ by the outside world.

So, I hope that those considering in GETTING a tattoo, in particular the younger generation of our world, our loved ones, that it is decided with maturity, thoughtfulness and most of all with self-confidence. I’ve seen family/friends get them with this new found sense of false bravado and individuality (kind of an oxymoron today). When you know that that is exactly what they are struggling with – self esteem, acceptance. Obviously not all, as some are darn confident at a very young age ~ kudos to them.

Otherwise, tattoos? To each their own..but just not on me.

(P.S. This question has so many layers…would make a great sociocultural anthropolgy study.)

Reply
Jeni

Ana

Thank you for saying it this way. I am so with you here, yes, I don’t like tattoos and would never get one myself, however those who do, it is their choice, not mine.

I do remember a story told me by a friend who was out walking in the city with her three year old grandaughter. They came across a young man who had tats right down both his arms, and the wee girl walked up to him and said, ‘You must have been a very good boy to get all those stamps’.

It is interesting how some try to look ‘different’ and ‘different’ becomes the fashion, and therefore, the same, and we look for something else to have that difference, happened in the sixties with denim, then everyone wore denim, everyone became the same, however denim is easier to remove than ink.

Fashion changes constantly, don’t they say the only constant is change?

Jeni

Reply
Vanna

I love beautiful tattoos on others!…And yes there are so many BADDDDD ones! But they’re not for me. My husband is Japanese and in Japan tattoos are very frowned upon. One of the favorite past times there is soaking in the hot springs. Many of which will have no admitance signs for tattoos. Zero tolerance for that cute little Mini Mouse on your ankle. Members of the Japanese mob (the yakuza) are often required to have extensive tattooing (Done my hand not machine to show they can endure great pain) so it is a BIG NO NO. *winks* Vanna

Reply
Pamela

Dear Vicki
So agree with KL – though it’s a rather unfair comparison with Pucci.

Believe abhorrence of tattoos is partly an age – and a class – thing. Interesting to read about the Japanese frowning on tattoos. It’s probably because tattoos there are associated with Japanese gangsters, the yakuza, who are virtually all tattooed. In other words a tattoo there is the mark of a criminal. In Australia too the tattoo parlours are generally owned by some of the more criminal bikie gangmembers.

Originality and individuality is not revealed or defined by what you do to your skin. Heaven help those who need a tattoo to create an image for themselves. There are so many better choices for people who want to express their creativity and individuality without deliberately deforming their God-given bodies. Best wishes, Pamela

Reply
Vicki

Self expression is an interesting concept… and we all contribute in different ways, that is certain… Perhaps it’s a generational thing… It certainly was not acceptable when I was a teenager… I would have been shot on sight!! And I did what I was told… ;)

Reply
Sharon

I myself have 2 very simple, deeply meaningful tattoos that are easily covered. I have had them for some time and I still smile when I catch a glimpse of them. As to the ‘elegance’ question, I believe that elegance comes from carriage of oneself and is more of an inner quality. I have seen many well dressed women who were still not elegant. I have seen a handful of tattooed women who were elegant. And there is a whole lot of in-between. I find elegance to be a rare and complicated thing. You never know from where you will find it. I also find it a touch sad that I read quite a bit of judgement in the comments. Writing off a whole subset of people as inherently in-elegant….seems a bit, well, in-elegant.

Reply
Vicki

Elegance as is you say a difficult one to define… and I agree whether you have a tattoo or not is not the definition… and elegance is certainly an inner quality… each to his own is the answer I feel… :)

Reply
Lou

Hi Vicki, I’ve been interested today to read the comments on this – and of course your post and Karl Lagerfeld’s view! It’s something I have changed my tune on in recent years; I used to hate tattoos and I still get a disdainful feeling when I see a really bad/conspicuous one. I saw a young, friendly-looking guy with his neck completely covered recently and that did make me sad as I think there really is no going back from that. But I can also see that people have an enormous identification with their tattoos and they can be very beautiful. I think particularly of women who have their mastectomy scar tattooed or where people have the dates or names of loved ones who has passed away tattooed, even in some cases in the transferred hand-writing of their lost person. There is real beauty in this and who are we to judge?!

Many commenters have expressed views on how tattoos will look when people have aged; to me I feel that when I am ‘older’ (I am 39 now) there will be a new definition of what is elegant on an aged person. I look to women like Helen Mirren or Susan Sarandon or Felicity Kendall – all of whom have tattoos. I quite like the blog ‘The Tattoologist’ which features lots of small, usually meaningful, but often very elegant tattoos that I think would stand the test of time. Thanks for such a thought-provoking post – whilst I think I am in the minority in not minding them! Lou x

Reply
Vicki

It’s fantastic to have an alternative point of view… and that is what a thought provoking question is all about… Thank you Lou… :)

Reply
pve

Karl is too funny.

I suppose if Helen Mirren or Susan Sarandon has a tattoo, then I might reconsider….but I really would not be able to decide….I do love the old school tatts….anchors, roses and such. I have seen some pretty intricate designs. I think I would prefer one Pucci Dress so that I could remove it when I tire of it.
pve

Reply
Pamela

I wonder why it might be more acceptable to have a tattoo if one found that Helen Mirren had one? I’m a great admirer – of her talent and skill as an actress and of her beauty and style. But for anyone who loathes tattoos, seeing someone you admire (in other ways) with them is no reason to emulate. If Helen Mirren had a tattoo it would disappoint and make me feel rather sad for her, but would never persuade me to follow. Isn’t that what individuality is partly about anyway? Luckily our family have inherited our strong views and values in regard to this subject. No-one, not even in the extended family on either side has a tattoo. Our lovely young grand-daughters have such beautiful skin, one a light olive, the other a pale peaches and cream. Both heart-stoppingly beautiful. I just can’t imagine defacing such beauty with a tattoo.

Reply
Leann

This is the best quote I’ve seen in a long time and addresses my absolute pet peeve–tattoos. Winter is so much better because they are mostly covered. Going to the pool these days feels like a freak show. There’s a reason why one used to have to go to the sleaziest part of town to get one. Also, what about the addiction. One doesn’t seem to be enough anymore. When will the trend stop and what will all these people do when it’s no longer cool or the “in” thing? I could rant for hours, but I’ll stop here and give you a huge thank you for being willing to address this subject!!!!!

Reply
Lissy Parker

I am with you Vicki. Hate them all-even the flower and butterfly ones. Just think what the beaches will look like in 20 years … or maybe not.
xo, Lissy

Reply
Karena

Dear Vicki,
I feel there are tattoos and then there are TATTOOS.
A small work of art that symbolizes something important to the wearer is one thing. Otherwise I am sorry I almost feel these huge ,almost all body tattoos are a desecration some may regret.

xoxo
Karena
Tom Scheerer Book Giveaway!

Reply
Merryn

Very interesting post, Vicki. And such entertaining responses! I, too, feel that tattoos have become almost mainstream in the younger generation and that many of these people will regret later in life the ‘ink’ choices they made back then – the ‘cupcake’ & the ‘fairy on a toadstool’ being recent examples of tattoos I have seen on young women. Looking back at photos of myself in younger years, I know that there were some (but not too many!) regrettable outfits and that age has developed my sense of style. Can’t imagine what it would be like still living with some tattoo that I thought was great back when I was a twenty-something. Then there are the mid-life tattoos – fresh ink on ageing skin does not attest to taste.

Reply
Vicki

I think we all have those regrettable outfits… Do you remember shoulder pads and the 80’s?? :)

Reply
Elizabeth

You have posed an interesting question…tattos are not for me, as you say perhaps an age thing. I think unfortunately for many young people it is like a right of passage or something. A few years ago one would see people with a small tattoo on their ankle or somewhere that could be hidden if necessary. Now it is not unusual to see an entire arm or leg or in the case of Cheryl Cole an entire lower body. I was shocked to see that.

I always say to each his own but I wonder how many people will regret some of these tattoos as they age.

Have a great week!

Reply
Vicki

We all regret things from our youth … it’s just with tattoos, they are a permanent reminder…

Reply
Esther George

Hi Vicki an interesting subject tattoos …. My daughter has a tattoo on her shoulder its not in your face thank god, her dad and I didn’t know at first then she came clean Not Happy especially her dad, for me well it’s done too late to be angry. My request please don’t do it again there will be a day when regret will set in. Regards Esther from Sydney.

Reply
Debbie

Hi Vicki
Permanently disfiguring myself with tattoos no matter how cute, trendy has never been of interest to me. The scars, pain and cost of removing them, you’d think would deter people from getting them in the first place. Ageing bodies with tattoos is not a good look. I often wonder what kind of work these tattoo covered people do. I’ve seen an advertisement for makeup that covers tattoos so maybe that’s the answer.
It’s bad enough growing older and having to bit by bit cover up more with clothing.
Tattoos don’t go with pretty clothes. Do people stay goth forever?
I have my ears pierced and I think that’s fine but when the whole ear is pierced that’s too much. As for private parts being pierced now that’s just weird, especially when chains are attached.
Maybe a cute little stud near the belly button on a twenty something flat tummied girl. At least it can be grown out later.

Reply
Melanie

Oh Vicki I am 100% with you, KL (and so many other readers). I am yet to find a tattoo that i think is attractive and while I try desperately not to judge – I do find it hard at times. Especially when I see a pretty young 18year old with limbs covered in ink or a mature 60 year old grandmother who has a freshly planted blotch on her shoulder blade? I just don’t get it and I know I never will. What I would like to ask though is “Will the trend end or is the trend more than just a trend?”. M

Reply
Vicki

I think the tattoo trend is in full swing… some will tire of it but others who feel strongly about the artistic side of the expression will continue… That’s my feeling…

Reply
Jeanne @ Collage of Life

I am afraid to look at the other comments Vicki..I am with you until my son came home with one on his arm. He spent three years working out a design to perfection. Every time he mentioned getting one I squirmed…I thought he was joking. One day, he lifted his sleeve and there it was. He said it was a popular thing to do in the army, everyone had one. He then told me the story behind it and I thought it was sweet..kind of. When he mentioned that his current girlfriend has them too…I gave up!
Express yourself…right? :)

xx

Reply
Vicki

Right!… And besides we have to be open minded and accepting… but we are also entitled to our opinions… I gave up a long time ago telling my 3 what to do! :)

Reply
Valerie G.

Thank you for this discussion! I live in a city (Seattle) where people of all ages are obsessed with branding their bodies. I am quite tired of having to deal with so many people’s tattoos, and have to say as people are ageing and gaining weight it is not a pretty site. In my opinion tattoos just don’t look good! There is a horrible lack of symmetry in relation to the human body. They almost always bother my sense of visual perception! There is nothing that can compete with the beauty/design/function of the human body…especially for those in harmony with their bodies.
I have often wondered if the tattoo craze took off in France like it has in the U.S., and have always doubted that it could. The French just seem to pragmatic on beauty, age, and the limits of the human body to mess it up like that…but you’re the expert here so do tell…
One particular thing that I find disturbing is how some women will tattoo pin-up style tattoos on their own bodies? As if one’s own sexuality isn’t enough, and that to put an image of another woman on one’s body would make one sexier??? This seems sad and depressing to me.

Reply
Vicki

I haven’t seen so many in France… although they are there… It’s difficult in colder climates because often people are covered… but I expect they are popular with many…
Next time I am in Paris I am going to do some research… it’s intriguing to me whether body art is also a cultural phenomena as well as a fashion statement.

Reply
Pamela

vicki..i have not read the other comments…i’m sure it’s been an interesting discussion! personally, i don’t like them. have never ever considered one for myself and pray my children don’t either! but, to each his own right?
living in paris i don’t see nearly as many tattoo’s as back in the states. i spent the summer back home and remember being shocked at how many tattoos i saw on the beach..men/women and of course young adults.
great post vicki!

Reply
Vicki

Thanks Pamela for your observations from Paris… I know the readers would love to know whether tattoos are as popular there as they are elsewhere… so keep us posted… :)

Reply
The Enchanted Home

I am very opinionated on this matter…cannot stand them period. I find them unattractive on anyone and as you age,they get uglier, lol.

For me its non negotiable, sure hope my kids feel the same as they get older!!

Reply
maggi

I think tattoos are absolutely awful. Why anybody would want to DIS-figure themselves is beyond me. I have three daughters and I feared that the middle one might want to ‘rebel’ and have one done. Fortunately a friend of hers who had a tattoo fell pregnant and this thing took on a life of it’s own and Kathryn thought it was gross. Also if you have to go to hospital and you have a tattoo, the first thing they do is test you for HIV. Very sad.

Reply
Pamela

Giving this further thought, it seems to me that tattoos on the body are a bit like graffiti on buildings. Proliferating as people want to make some kind of mark that they hope will validate and distinguish them as individuals – as sadly they haven’t the imagination or opportunity to do this in a more productive way. Some may be quite artistic and clever but it doesn’t mean that one would want any on one’s own house – or body. But the tattoo, which may have been the result of just a day’s impulse or a few two many drinks is very difficult, expensive and painful to remove.
Some associations tattoos bring to mind: sailors, criminals, blood infections, HIV and the holocaust – the tattooed numbers permanently imprinted on the arms of people who survived the death camps. In the sixties as a young teenager I saw many of these during Australian summers and at first wondered what they meant. Such a sad association.

Reply
Astrid in DC

I have 5, and plan to get more! Three of which I’ve had over 20 years – before they were “cool”. I love my ink, it’s part of who I am. You have to be comfortable in your skin to pull off tattoo’s…

Reply
Lorri

I thinking … so what if it’s an “age thing”? It goes both ways – twenty-somethings are only doing it because it’s popular now.

I really hate most of them for the exact reason you said. The vast majority of tattoos are quite ugly even as a piece of art.

A few years ago, I saw an ad for Chanel where they had painted a fake tatoo on the model. The “tatoo” looked like a piece of lace that wove along her shoulder and arm. That’s when it hit me. I wondered why tatoo artists hardly ever do beautiful enhancing tatoos.

Instead they are either goulish or silly and often placed awkwardly on the body.

Reply
naomi

I read that comment and laughed, and then read through the many comments, most which seem against tats. Well, overall I must agree. I do have many friends with them, some as remembrances of others and events. I’ve considered them as I have a number of scars from accidents and surgeries, and due to those people already stare as I do not hide my disfigurement. I lived and those were the price, but sometimes it seems it might be funny to have leaves coming off the ‘vines’ of old suture lines – something growing up my leg where was once a foot (’til a car took it), or blooms opening by my armpit, removed for cancer. No; I need the skin clear for doctors to examine, ensuring no more cancer. The leg still aches though it’s been sixteen years – why add pain? Many seem to need a mark as a remembrance. I say, wait, life may add them without asking.

Reply
catie

to each their own.
after sitting through a friend’s tattoo, i choose NO.
{needles? pain? healing? a design i might hate in 5 or 10 years?}
but, our bodies are temporary…
done with the right sense of humor & style, i could say YES.
♥catie

Reply
Sarah

Hi Vicky
Thanks for that fabulous quote – Karl has it spot on for me.
I have a few friends who chose maouri style tatoos when they were fashionable in the 90’s, usually on their lower back, and are regretting them now. I was reading an article yesterday on the BBC website about the rise of text tatoos and that, apart from those in a different language that don’t quite translate as the owner had thought they do, one of the biggest things not considered is how the ink changes over time, often leaving them illegible.
I think it’s ultimately a really personal thing. If i’d had one and ‘grown out of it’ so to speak, i’d have to think about what it represented in that I had freedom of choice and conviction to have it done in the first place, even if the sentiments had changed over the years. However, I never have had one, for the reason that i’ve never had that conviction.
My husband hates them. I think it’s completely about personal choice, and some tattoos are quite beautiful and quite sexy. I’m glad I live in a world where people have the choice to ink their body if they want to express themselves in that way.
However, it shouldn’t be so, but the downside is that I do think people get judged on appearances in a very negative way if they are excessively tatooed, or have them in places like their face or neck area.
It’s a really interesting debate and probably one that will go on forever. Like a lot of things my opinion on them for myself is different to how I feel about others being able to choose them – similar to how I feel about piercings, hairstyles even choices of clothing/fashion. Thanks for raising the debate though and making me think!
Sarah x

Reply
Janet

It will be a small group of folks who opted for tattoos when they were young and shiny who do not regret them when old.

Why not judge them? I think it shows a lack of good judgement on their part. Why are we afraid to say so?

My husband and I were traveling lately and saw a family of four eating breakfast at the next table. Their son – perhaps 18 or 19 years old – had the requisite set of tats because, of course, he was letting the world know how much of an individual he was. More disturbingly, he had those large, grommet-like plugs in his earlobes that had created holes about 1-1/2 inches in diameter. Would anyone like to tell me that he will be lovin’ those lobes when he 1.) keeps getting rejected for jobs that do not involve making expensive coffee drinks or 2.) wants to be taken seriously in any other endeavour?

Reply
Loribeth

I’m with you on this one. I won’t judge people who have tats, but I not get one. I have seen some very beautiful tattoos, but I know they don’t stay looking that way…the ink spreads, the skin gets saggy and there’s just no way to stop time and nature from destroying them.

Reply
deborah

I have just recently found your page and am spending a little time here and there enjoying! Thank you!

Ah, the ink. Well, I must confess to having one tattoo on the upper left side of my back. I had it done in my 30’s simply because I wanted to see something else besides a scar I have on the other side.

It’s not large and overbearing, and to be honest most people I know don’t even have any idea it exists. It was just for me, put in a place that is completely covered even if I wear a tank top. I do know many other women my age who have plenty. I think it’s great if that is what they like.

For me, it was personal. I do however think, the rest home will be quite a bit different when I get there! LOL

Reply
Noreen

Well I have two very discreet tattoos. Easily covered for work, I am a civil engineer. They have great meaning to me; one I aquired after my father’s passing and the other when I was young and used to sail the Carribean as crew on a rich mans yacht. I have never regretted them. When I am old, I will probably not be all that beautiful anyway, so I’ll probably have the tattoos covered when out in public or “out of my room at the nursing home.” So I don’t see what difference it makes.

As for KL, he is a brilliant designer, he is also very outspoken, and as for his looks…well, even with all his weight loss, he’s not exactly beautiful either. In fact some of his statements make him appear rather ugly at times. There’s more to class, beauty, etc. than lack of tattoos.

Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

powered by chloédigital