27 Mar 2010

Arrondissement… Name Change


 

The Francophilia Gazette published this interesting little titbit about the original names of the 20 Parisian arrondissements.

Each area was known by name not by number as they are now – in fact the arrondissements have not been called by name since 1859.

Bit of a shame really….it sounds so much cuter to say…I live in the Gobelins or the Popincourt…. than I live in the 13th or the 11th… xv

 

Name Your Arrondissement

1 – Arrondissement du Louvre
2 – Arrondissement de la Bourse
3 – Arrondissement du Temple
4 – Arrondissement de l’Hôtel de Ville
5 – Arrondissement du Panthéon
6 – Arrondissement du Luxembourg
7 – Arrondissement du Palais Bourbon
8 – Arrondissement de l’Elysée
9 – Arrondissement de l’Opéra
10 – Arrondissement de l’Entrepôt
11 – Arrondissement de Popincourt
12 – Arrondissement de Reuilly
13 – Arrondissement des Gobelins
14 – Arrondissement de l’Observatoire
15 – Arrondissement de Vaugirard
16 – Arrondissement de Passy
17 – Arrondissement de Batignolles Monceau
18 – Arrondissement des Buttes Montmartre
19 – Arrondissement des Buttes Chaumont
20 – Arrondissement de Ménilmontant.

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51 Comments

Cathy

I agree with you, I think the names are lovely. Gorgeous photo of the flowers as well. I have Paris envy now.

Reply
Karyn

What stunning roses, I imagine it smelled wonderful !
Does that mean you are back ? I hope the muscles have relaxed now.
Karyn

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Linda Carswell

Vicki I am loving the French education you are giving us. I have been jotting bits and pieces down in my travel diary for later this year…

Linda x

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A.J. at NighBluey Herald

You are sooo right – the original names are so much more fun, so much more evocative of the place – the sound they made as if part of the very place…so much nicer than the number but hey, even numbers sound great in French, n'est pas, so it's not a total loss – hope your weekend is full of Spring – have a vintage brooch giveaway on my blog if you are interested…ox AJ

Reply
Di Overton

Oh no, I don't speak a word of French so I would never be able top pronounce them :(
I am thinking of Paris at the moment. Haven't seen my little girl since October but going in May – can't wait.

Reply
A Gift Wrapped Life

Yes it does sound nicer by name….but much easier to say the 12th or 14th than by name in my high school french which is pretty non-existant by now. Should have paid more attention! Have the best weekend Vicki!

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elizabeth

Interesting fact about Paris…I never knew that.
I do however often think of living in Paris and so
enjoy your posts… Perhaps some day…
best,
E

Reply
kiki

i have been introduced to your fabulous blog by antje who canot wait to read your bits every day and i in turn sent the link to a friend of mine who lives in paris part of the year with her french love.

thank you for giving us little bits of joy !

xoxo
Kiki

Reply
vignette design

I love that picture! It is just gorgeous. Thanks for the names of the arrondissements. I will try to learn them, as I think it does make it more interesting.

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Stephanie @ La Dolce Vita

Oh I love this photo, and the bit of history. I agree that the names sound better – and much easier, I think, for non-locals to get their bearing. (what could be clearer than Arrondissement du Louvre?)
Have a wonderful weekend!
Best,
Stephanie

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Sophia Mnemosyne

The roses are beautiful! I agree the names are much more interesting – than numbers – I wonder why they started using numbers?

Have a great day.

Reply
Randi

I totally agree with you…it sounds much cuter…*smile*.
I love your photo with all the beautiful roses. It looks like the pink one – on the top – is my favorite rose. It is very "photogenic" with lovely hues of pink and light green! It´s my favorite photomodel!!!
I wish you a great weekend!

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joanny

Your picture of the roses is so Parisan–when I think of Paris nothing speaks to me greater then the beautiful florist, and of course my two favorites Champs-Elysees and the Arc de Triomphe, and everyone knows the icon of the Eiffel Tower.

Joanny

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Renee Finberg

the roses are beautiful.

my turf when i would stay and work in paris,
was always in the 6th …just blocks from the 7th.

xx wish i were there

Reply
Shell Sherree

The names are beautiful, the numbers are practical ~ maybe you can start a movement to bring names back into common use alongside the numbers, Vicki! Speaking of beautiful, so is your photo. Have a lovely weekend!

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Millie

Looks like practicality won out here Vicki – lovely to read this little snippet of Parisian history though. The roses are divine, I'm feeling a little jaded today, so they are the perfect pick-me up.
Millie ^_^

Reply
koralee

Thank you for visiting me the other day…your blog is lovely. That image is amazing..I love the fact that names are used instead of numbers. Have a wonderful weekend. xo

Reply
Virginia

Oh Vicki,
Why hasn't anyone ever told me this? I think I will be able to find my way around Paris even better with this list. Merci,
V

Reply
SPLENDEROSA

Hi Vicki, maybe it's like zip codes. Soon we may not have names of cities in the USA, only numbers.
Like 90210, you know? But for me, the romance is in the names. Thank you for giving us this today…AND the perfection of those roses. Just beautiful. xx's Marsha

Reply
Flick,

Oh… just keep talking to me in French! I love all their words, and everything sounds better with long French names!!
Beautiful roses too.
:)

Reply
Paris Atelier

Hi Vicki
WHat an interesting post. I never knew that. I agree, it is both more romantic as wel as easier to say! Gorgeous photo!
xoxo
Judith~

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Ms. K @ Write On Thyme

Vicki,
Thank you so much for sharing this! I love knowing that ours was once called Arrondissement du Vaugirard before being called simply "The 15th"! And across from us in the 16th, Passy makes perfect sense!
A wonderful post!
Bon Lundi!
Kirsten

Reply
Virginia

Good grief V, why hasn't anyone else ever explained it like you just did! l love this . I like a good landmark to help me remember things. Merci!
V

Reply

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