25 Apr 2017

How To Wear Pink And Feel Like A Grown Up

How To Wear Pink and Look Like A Grown Up on vickiarcher.com

What is it about pink that can make us feel like little girls?
Wearing the wrong pink can mean sophistication, elegance and that personal style place we want to be disappears; wearing the right pink and we feel feminine, fabulous and ready to take on the world.

Pink is tricky and admittedly not for everyone but if you have always loved pink, like I have, it is not a colour to eliminate in haste. Pink requires reflection, thought and a small amount of experiment.



How to Wear Pink?

First things first.

Do not be afraid of pink and see it as a shade for everyone else but you; remember when worn well it is a great and flattering friend.


There is pink and then there is pink.

Pink is a multitude of shades and can be touched with purples, oranges and red. This is where finding the right pink becomes key. An orange pink suits some, a purple pink others, and it all depends on skin and hair colouring.


The colour pink is a little like leopard print; a little can go a long way.

Dressed top to toe in pink, even when we are “better not younger” is not going to grant any favours. Like the leopard spot, wear one pink at a time.


Experiment with lip shades.

Generally the shade of pink that works for the lips is the shade to work with in the wardrobe.


Accessorise with neutrals.

Pink, all shades and in-between work best when worn with other neutrals. The pink is striking enough and the neutrals provide the willing backdrop. Last year I took a deep breath and bought a Schiaparelli coloured pink coat. I deliberated for many months but a sale price got me over the line. It was quite a brave purchase. I have never looked back but it is only ever worn with black or cream and that makes a striking touch rather than being over the top.


Work from the bottom up.

Pink shoes are the best way to feel like a grown up. As an accessory a creamy blush pink, think ballerinas pirouetting their stuff across the stage in those heavenly shades of tulle, is the perfect shade for most accessories.




How To Wear Pink and Look Like A Grown Up on vickiarcher.comHow To Wear Pink and Look Like A Grown Up on vickiarcher.com

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


For shoes, blush pink is the dream.


Blush pink is the perfect step into a pink world and the most neutral of shades for the feet, without feeling like they are the same as every other pair of shoes. Blush pink feet look beautiful with all black, totally serene with the charcoal greys and of course perfect with cream. If you are feeling brave and can support yellow, try that winner of a combination.


And don’t get me started with red and blush pink as a pairing.


I have often found in later years my feet are far braver than my body. Do you know what I mean? I may stick with a lot of neutral clothing and simple styling to compliment the grey hair but when it comes to my feet I am way more willing to experiment. I like colour on the feet and the blush shoes, pumps, flats or sandals work brilliantly, especially if they are a little adorned with some razzle-dazzle.


How to wear pink and feel like a grown up is easy if you start with blush pink shoes. A wardrobe should include a variety of blush pink, whether it is sneakers or heels. Then when the don’t-know-what-to-wear moment inevitably rears its familiar head, this is an easy place to start.


I often wear the favourite black pants and jacket but then try to think outside of my comfort zone and add these blush pink shoes. It works and takes the outfit up a notch or two. Try it and let me know what you think.




How To Wear Pink and Look Like A Grown Up on vickiarcher.com



Blush pink is a pink win/win. Especially in these pretties. xv





 
 

Blushing Pink And Feeling Like A grown Up

***DECORSLIDE SANDAL  ||  MARY MIDPUMP  ||  MULEARKY SATIN ADOBE  ||  MOODY PUMP  ||  MARY PUMP




Thank you Stuart Weitzman for partnering with, ‘How To Wear Pink and Feel Like A Grown Up’

images, steven meisel 

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19 Comments

candice

Not to be a name dropper but … I mostly wear black .. black and white or just black. It is a habit .. easy and generally looks fine. Although living in NY, it made more sense than living in the US South .. to add a bit of color to my wardrobe,especially for warm weather … I still wear black but carry a pale pink Prada bag .
lol

Reply
Pamela

Pink can be lovely. Can imagine how wonderful your coat looks – but do post a photo of yourself wearing it. So many women are afraid of colour, particularly as they get older – or worry it’s too gaudy for them. But just think of the Queen – and at her age. She wears one beautiful colour after the next and always looks wonderful. She keeps black outfits for funerals and mourning only. Of course we don’t need to be quite so restrictive about black. But still. She’s an example to us all. Best wishes, Pamela

Reply
Vicki

It’s so her look isn’t it? The colours work beautifully for her and she always wears in a unique colour… Besides she has the most youthful skin and is so feminine and petite. She is her own style “Queen”.

I am afraid I am a black outfit kind of girl, always have been and colour is an accent I love but one I play carefully with. :)

Reply
candice

When you live in a large city , I think a woman tends to wear black more .. especially if you are working .
“Country girls”/ suburbanites, tend to wear more colorful clothing.
yes, a great deal of research went into this … lol

Reply
Pamela

Candice,
With advantage of years, I think black as dominant colour may have escalated in the last 20 years of 20th century. There was always the LBD before but it wasn’t the universal it seems to have become. As a young thing about town I lived in the UK for 5 years – one of those in London, the rest in Cambridge. It was at the far edge of Mary Quant and Biba. We wore bright reds, orange, hot pink, dull greens, mustard with red and yellow. Black was hardly seen, even in the evenings in London (one party we attended was graced by Princess Margaret in her heyday). Do admit to wearing navy – my going away outfit was a navy linen dress with a Peter Pan collar – the jacket in navy, white and yellow geometric weave. A fresh yellow rose at the collar. Same outfit went to Ascot Royal Enclosure soon after. With a yellow hat.
Black seemed to take over in the 90s. By then I was well into a career and attending international conferences. Most of the women wore black/navy (but not all, the leader of the French in Paris wore a ravishing pink ensemble one day). I had to look immaculate/professional because I was representing my country. But I didn’t think it had to be black. So I wore suit jackets in bright red, hot fuchsia pink, emerald etc with white shirts and black pants. Well cut and tailored. With designer scarves (Hermes, Chanel, Versace etc). I also had a black jacket in case of a solemn occasion. I looked different from most – but it was useful because people could locate me quickly and were attracted by the colour. The male delegates forever complimented my choice of colours and said how wonderful. Really helped build my contacts network, starting right at the top. Soon found the Conference President and Secretary-General (who loathed each other) were competing over who would sit at my table for early breakfast. Whoever got to the dining room first would sit with me, the other would take a table alone. From each learned all key developments, issues, problems etc for each day – and I always knew if I had an issue I could take it up with one or both because we were on such good terms. (The rest of my delegation breakfasted late so I’d always take a table alone and just see who might join me. That was kind of fun.) The big wigs always breakfasted v early. At other conferences it might be other leaders, eg I became friends with leaders of the British delegation over the years – and still hear from one.
I like colours but I’m not exactly a country mouse. Conferences I participated in included locations like Paris, Copenhagen, Madrid, Istanbul, Beijing etc. Have also spent time in Tokyo, Moscow, New York, Washington, Vienna, Berlin, Rome etc. Though my current home town is quite small and not at all a fashion mecca. Best wishes, Pamela

Reply
Leslie in Oregon

It sounds like you should consider writing a book, Pamela. I have enjoyed your comments and stories here over the years!

Pamela

Vicki, Have seen some of your IG shots. You look fabulous, whatever you wear. Much more fashion forward than I would always have guessed from your blog posts! Black suits you – and you’re very clever with your colour accents. Sadly I’ve attended too many funerals over the years to feel really happy in black. Somehow if I wear colour I feel happier and in higher spirits. It’s more mood elevating for me than black. But everyone is different – and it would be a boring world if we all dressed alike. Best wishes, Pamela

Reply
candice

LOL, walk down the street in NYC and see all the “mourners” .. I think it is a distinct difference in City vs Country dressing. Black/black and white etc are good when you have to dress every day for an office/work and not have a huge wardrobe. And not have others in the office notice that you wore that pink dress already :)

Reply
Taste of France

Pink lipstick, in the palest shade, can be so flattering, just a bit more alive than nude (and more flattering when we’re not as young as the models shown) for those times when the attention is on our eyes.

Reply
Emily

I was interested in your post until I came across the sentence “Dressed top to toe in pink, even when we are “better not younger” is not going to grant any favours.” This is an incredibly ageist statement. Do you honestly think of pink as an old lady color? I am a boomer, so no longer young, and I was interested in your article because I wanted to learn how to feel comfortable wearing a touch of pink. I shy away because I think people will think of me as a sweet old lady if I wear even a touch of pink. Your comment, however well intended, does nothing to dispel this fear. I wear mostly blacks and grays to show off jewelry and scarves (that are NOT pink). A few years back, I bought a pale pink sweater, put it on, took it off, and threw it away. Recently, I bought another which I wore with black pants and a jacket which hid 90% of it. Now with your comment associating pink with older women, I am thinking of tossing it also. So can you come up with some advice to help all women, or do I assume that the prejudice continues, and that if an older woman wants to be taken at all seriously, she should run as fast as possible from pink?

Reply
Vicki

You misunderstand my sentence Emily, or most likely it is me who crafted it badly. I’d say that’s more likely ;)

I do not think of pink as “old lady” and have loved pink all my life. I think I have mentioned that here and certainly on many other occasions. The point of my piece is how we can wear pink, not to avoid it and to embrace it.

“Dressed top to toe in pink, even when we are “better not younger” is not going to grant any favours.”

Wearing all pink, for example pink trousers, sweaters and shoes is not a good look at any age, that is what I am trying to say.
“Even when we are “better not younger” is not meaning age is negative but quite the contrary, fabulous ( This is an expression I use frequently and one I am 100% behind ) and even if we are totally fabulous, which we are… wearing all pink from top to toe isn’t! Of course this is my opinion and it has nothing to do with age. I don’t think anyone looks that great in matching pink everything…

Sorry for the confusion :) The very last thing I am is aegist… Never, ever!

Do not toss your pink… and re-read how I suggest pink is wonderful with black, grey and neutrals.
I am a great fan of pink as an accessory and age has nothing to do with it. xv

Reply
Pamela

Vicki,
Agree there are risks with wearing all pink. But sometimes it can look fabulous! The French woman I mentioned above was ALL in pink and she looked magnificent. Even to the pink of her lipstick – it was an unusual shade. One of our delegates, a VIP woman, was so impressed she asked her who the designer was as she wanted to get the same outfit herself. Not sure now, it’s long ago, but it may have been Prada. Anyway, she went to the boutique but heartbroken to find they didn’t have her size in the full outfit. So she just bought the same jacket in a very beautiful, very unusual colour – a kind of pale-mid sea green-blue. She later regretted she didn’t buy matching skirt as it was hard to find the right coloured skirt or pants to wear with it. But at the time her broken heart had been set on the pink. “Funny Face” was just screened on TV – such fun and of course there’s the “Think Pink” song.
Women should feel worried about whatever colour they choose to wear. If it suits you and you love it – have confidence! Enjoy. Don’t let others put you off. I was told by a woman in my department once that she thought colours were unprofessional – we should all be wearing black, like her. Best wishes, Pamela

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Trish Murphy

Vicki I loved your post on pink this morning. A funny thing happened shortly afterwards.My husband and I went to the Boathouse at Palm Beach ( you may have been on visits to Sydney) for a coffee before a walk to The Barrenjoey Lighthouse. To my amazement in walked a lovely woman in a plain grey dress and … fabulous high heels in blush tones with a rose coloured heel and edge to the shoe.!!! Maybe Manolo Blahnik. My husband wondered why I was staring at the shoes had to explain your post. Her partner was in very casual gear and runners so in any case she was going to stand out. But your point of lovely pink or blush shoes was spot on. We slunk out in our shorts and runners!!!

Reply
Anita Rivera

I was going to say that for me, pink only works best when I couple it with either black or gray. Alone, pink does not work on me! Pink with black stripes, SO FRENCH. Pink with gray cashmere, sooooo sophisticated! I love pink, but I think I prefer it in small amounts in my décor such as in flowers, rather than on me!

Reply
Kim

💓💖💗💕💞💓 sometimes pink crystal jewelry looks stunning either rings, earrings or a chunky glistening neckless. Just that ‘pop’ of elegant shine lifts and brings joy instantly – crystal gives light. Esp pink .

Reply

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